fbpx

Q: Where is the budget information regarding what money comes to dispatch/LPD from other departments when dispatchers dispatch other city resources?

A: Per agreement with Albany County, 20% of annual municipal expenditure for operation of the Laramie Albany County Records & Communications Center (LARC) is reimbursed. These amounts are published within the budget publication. In FY20 $378,574 was reimbursed by Albany County.

Q: Has there been an increase in revenue consistent with the increase in LPD’s budget within the last fiscal year?

A: Revenue growth has outpaced spending for police services in Laramie. Since FY2018, revenue has increased 2.61% while spending for policing increased by 0.74%.

Q: Does the LPD own or pay to maintain the military-grade equipment that many see as inappropriate/unnecessary for our community?
Q: How much does bearcat upkeep cost a month? How much money could we sell/melt the bearcat for?

A: The original Peacekeeper was free to the City in the early-2000’s through the 1033 program. The vehicle was destroyed by declared a total loss as a result of the Evidence Building fire and subsequently replaced (at no cost). The Bearcat is a refurbished (not new) armored vehicle that is defensive in nature. It is not a militarized vehicle but, rather, a vehicle built specifically for civilian law enforcement purposes. We estimate that upkeep each month costs about $5.00 (the cost of electricity since it is plugged in so we ensure it will start if needed) and it has a yearly oil change (estimated at $75.00). Fuel expenses are minimal – it uses diesel fuel and we don’t put that many miles on it.

Q: Do you plan on continuing to increase the size of LPD’s department?

A: The size of city government staffing has not increased. Our goal is always to staff all services adequately to serve Laramie residents. With some of the lowest tax revenues in our state, it’s an ongoing struggle to meet the needs and expectations of the residents we serve. Staffing levels have not kept pace with the growing demands of the community’s increasing population. This holds true, as well, for LPD when we break out the department’s staffing level from all city positions. Laramie currently has 47 police officers, or 1.44 full-time equivalent positions per 1,000 Laramie residents.

Q: Would the city council enact programs like the Mental Health Co-Responder offered in Fort Collins, CO by Fort Collins Police Services? The program promotes de-escalation and connecting with and helping community members without using force as often as possible. (link = https://www.fcgov.com/police/mental-health)

A: LPD has partnered with Peak Wellness to respond to welfare checks on people in the Gatekeeper program. These are mental health calls for service (MHCFS) initiated by Peak and, with proper training, we hope that eventually counselors can respond without an officer if they feel there is not a safety concern. We continue to have discussions through the Mental Health Board about how we could initiate non-officer or co-officer response to MHCFS but currently there is not funding or capacity to initiate a program similar to Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets (CAHOOTS), Respond, Empower, Advocate, Listen (REAL), or Support Team Assisted Response (STAR).

Q: Would the Laramie City Council implement programs similar to the Youth At Risk Development (YARD) implement in Calgary, Alberta? The program enables officers to engage in recreation activities with local youths using a community policing model – a proactive form of law enforcement to improve community relationships and prevent crime before it happens (link = https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/yth-rsk-dvlpmnt/index-en.aspx).

A: Officers have taught bike safety to youth for 25 years along with numerous youth programs initiated by LPD (safety city, elementary classroom presentations on a regular basis, etc.) In addition, many officers are involved in youth activities and sport outside of work like coaching.

Q: Would the city council promote programs for LPD officers like the ‘Make it Safe Police Officer Initiative’? The initiative aims to reduce mental health stigma through education, enable every officer to ‘self-monitor’ and take personal responsibility for their mental wellness, and obtain psychological support throughout their career? (link = https://www.jackdigliani.com/index.html)

A: The city provides wellness programs and support to all staff, including tailored support for our first responders and public safety – including law enforcement. We are not familiar with the specific program mentioned in the question, but staff intend to look into it to learn more.

Q: Please insist that the police department screen all potential hires for racist, misogynistic, and bigoted comments on social media. Also please insist that every officer receives sensitivity training and Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) training to recognize a mental health crisis in the field. By the way, I do think the PD is already better at this discernment than the sheriff’s office.

A: During backgrounding process, LPD screens for bias, violent tendencies, ethical decision making, and appropriate use of social media. These attributes are also explored during the mandatory psychological test conducted as part of the background process. All personnel are trained in how to respond to mental health calls for service (MHCFS) at some level – CIT, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR), Mental Health First Aid – newly added this year.

Q: I am an elementary school teacher here in Laramie. I think a smart and safe action to take with the budget would be to allocate some of it to hiring a full-time mental health professional whose job it is to respond to incidents involving people confirmed to have or suspected of having mental illness. Thank you for considering my and the rest of the community’s input.

A: LPD has partnered with Peak Wellness to respond to welfare checks on people in the Gatekeeper program. These are mental health calls for service (MHCFS) initiated by Peak and, with proper training, we hope that eventually counselors can respond without an officer if they feel there is not a safety concern. We continue to have discussions through the Mental Health Board about how we could initiate non-officer or co-officer response to MHCFS but currently there is not funding or capacity to initiate a program similar to Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets (CAHOOTS), Respond, Empower, Advocate, Listen (REAL), or Support Team Assisted Response (STAR).

Q: Want to [know] why City paid 23million dollars for X-Wyo tech prop[erty] north of town and 300.000 to tear down NEED TO DRAIN THE SWAMP! Who in the city made Money!

A: “This question does not pertain to policing services; however, we’ve provided background and status report for this project. The City has known of the need to consolidate public works operations and replace currently insufficient facilities since the late 1990s. Public works encompass more than half of all municipal operations including construction, maintenance and management of the street, storm water, potable water, and wastewater systems; maintenance of the city’s vehicle and mobile equipment fleet; and, the collection and disposal of solid waste and recyclables at the Landfill & Waste Disposal facility.
In 2014, site selection for the project began with 17 sites identified as possible locations for a new Municipal Operations Center (MOC). Existing facilities on North 4th Street range in age from roughly 40 – 80 years old. Site 11, the location of the former Wyotech Institute-North Campus, had recently become vacant with no foreseeable lessor or owner. This site had known challenges including the need for retrofitting of fire suppression, infrastructure and both structural and MEP upgrades. Merits of Site 11 for municipal use were many but, most notably, two factors prevailed; the site is outside of existing and planned residential neighborhoods and ongoing cost savings and operational efficiencies will accrue at this location due to its centrality within the future planned growth trajectory of the city. Consequently, a purchase offer was extended to the property owner and the site was acquired. The city conducted a feasibility study that substantiated that repurposing the site was the least cost alternative.
Demolition and construction/reconstruction activities have started this year after extensive architectural and financial planning. Two of the four major buildings on the site will be modified to make them useable for municipal public works operations. The new footprint is about 10,000 sq. feet of usable space, including community use areas. The total cost of the project is expected to be $21.5 million, inclusive of purchase, asbestos abatement, demolition, design, environmental analysis, material testing, replacement of HVAC, roofs, mechanical, electrical, plumbing to meet current codes and municipal regulations. There will be sufficient indoor storage at the MOC to protect and extend the lifespan of the multi-million dollar municipal fleet and equipment inventory, from solid waste trucks, to heavy equipment and landscape, fencing, and infrastructure materials like water/sewer pipe and pumps.
The MOC represents a 50+ year investment and it has taken a number of years to bring together sufficient funding for the project from a variety of sources including bonding of $2 M, grant funding $975,000, and an interfund loan of $3 M. The project was purposefully timed and sized to ensure it would not affect water, sewer or solid waste fees paid by utility customers and was initiated as a regular project in the City’s CIP program. Both business enterprise and general government funds will contribute proportionately to the project with costs ranging between $4.0 -$6.5M per fund. The total estimated contribution to the project from general tax-based revenue is $3.325 M.”

City of Laramie Frequently Asked Questions

CoL-FAQs.pdf
%d bloggers like this: